Slow Fashion, The Anti-Trend

I’m always wishing that the clothing industry might find its way toward a less petrochemical line of production, says Andre Walker, designer

i-D magazine, Steve Salter

SALE, SALE, CLEARANCE!  Consumers are not interested. EDGExpo.com
SALE, SALE, CLEARANCE! Consumers are not interested.

As the founder and principal of EDGE, I concur with Andre’s statement and see that Americans have become too obsessed with fast, cheap fashion that’s a continual stream of sameness. The fashion industry has become a victim to a disposable society who gives less value to quality, craftsmanship, and innovation. Today’s trendy must-haves become tomorrow’s cast-offs. What’s disappointing is that this fast and excessive market erodes the desire because of the overexposure.

Fashion History The American System For Fashion - www.eurbanista.com
Fashion History The American System For Fashion – http://www.eurbanista.com
Luncheon-Oct2012-374
Chicago Fashion Design Center

EDGE is a platform, philosophy, and vision for support of those fashion creators [brands and designers] that push the boundaries to bring meaningful and unique collections to the market.  Their pieces tell stories behind their creations, are conversation pieces, environmentally conscious, and have longevity.

IMG_4899

The fashion industry is stagnant but there is new blood [EDGE] out there.

Most of us did not live through the times when fashion was largely a designer-centered, custom-made business. By the end of the 20th century, new technologies and mass manufacturing led to the rise of the current industry as we know it today – MASSIVE, EXCESSIVE, and more of THE SAME.  The designer-led, creative component has become less important.  This alternative movement of Slow Fashion is bringing back to the forefront the individual artisan and independent retailer.

Ghina Maalouf, Contribitor www.Fashionbi.com
Ghina Maalouf, Contribitor, http://www.Fashionbi.com

 

Feature Image:  sustainable fashion, Bead & Reel, an ethical boutique | photo Cindy Ceballos

Read more at Sustainable EDGE.

Find more stories, features, images, videos, and Looks of EDGE on our website and social media platforms.  Connect to EDGE’s world!  Like us on Facebook, follow us on TwitterInstagram, and YouTube..

 

3 Comments

  1. Tracy McNeill

    I think that the fashion industry should be flexible enough for both ends of the spectrum. The idea of a “trend” is that it is cyclical and therefore not long-lasting. Being able to buy inexpensive items to follow a temporary “craze” makes more sense than spending lots of money for something that is good for one season only. When one speaks of traditional items, those that have a shelf-life over decades, then yes having an option as described by EDGE makes all the sense in the world. I think when you read about fashion influencers, you realize that they strike a balance between both.

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